"At Planned Parenthood, we see the impact of abortion stigma firsthand, in the women who delay getting reproductive health care because they fear they’ll be labeled and judged. We see the effect of stigma on doctors, health center staffers, and others who help provide abortion services. And we see the impact in laws that regulate and restrict abortion in ways that would never happen with any other medical procedure."

whitebeltwriter:

leslieknope-s:

[x]

This needs more notes

Just fyi, submissions are always welcome!

starbombpotter:

GUYS COLORADO NEEDS SOME HELP

There is a bill about to be passed called Amendment 67 that is the ban on ALL abortions. THIS INCLUDES IF THE PERSON WOULD DIE OR IF THEY WAS RAPED. THIS BILL ALSO CAN MAKE POLICE INSTIGATE ALL NON-LIVE BIRTHS (MISCARRIAGE/STILLBORN).

If you want more information, the article is [here] and they have an indigogo page [here] to help fund the stop of Amendment 67.

TUMBLR PLEASE BLOW THIS UP. PLEASE IM BEGGING YOU

sexologistinthemaking:

Alright ya’ll let me tell you about this hella rad app called sex positive. It was developed by the community health center of the university of Oregon (who’s partnered with the community health center in CU Boulder which is were I’m interning at) and it’s a super wonderful non heteronormative, kink (and vanilla) friendly app that gives a lot of tips and advice on how to have fun clean safe consensual sex. I really recommend it and I hope you love it as much as I do! (Too find it in the App Store search “sex positive Oregon”)
sexologistinthemaking:

Alright ya’ll let me tell you about this hella rad app called sex positive. It was developed by the community health center of the university of Oregon (who’s partnered with the community health center in CU Boulder which is were I’m interning at) and it’s a super wonderful non heteronormative, kink (and vanilla) friendly app that gives a lot of tips and advice on how to have fun clean safe consensual sex. I really recommend it and I hope you love it as much as I do! (Too find it in the App Store search “sex positive Oregon”)
sexologistinthemaking:

Alright ya’ll let me tell you about this hella rad app called sex positive. It was developed by the community health center of the university of Oregon (who’s partnered with the community health center in CU Boulder which is were I’m interning at) and it’s a super wonderful non heteronormative, kink (and vanilla) friendly app that gives a lot of tips and advice on how to have fun clean safe consensual sex. I really recommend it and I hope you love it as much as I do! (Too find it in the App Store search “sex positive Oregon”)
sexologistinthemaking:

Alright ya’ll let me tell you about this hella rad app called sex positive. It was developed by the community health center of the university of Oregon (who’s partnered with the community health center in CU Boulder which is were I’m interning at) and it’s a super wonderful non heteronormative, kink (and vanilla) friendly app that gives a lot of tips and advice on how to have fun clean safe consensual sex. I really recommend it and I hope you love it as much as I do! (Too find it in the App Store search “sex positive Oregon”)

sexologistinthemaking:

Alright ya’ll let me tell you about this hella rad app called sex positive. It was developed by the community health center of the university of Oregon (who’s partnered with the community health center in CU Boulder which is were I’m interning at) and it’s a super wonderful non heteronormative, kink (and vanilla) friendly app that gives a lot of tips and advice on how to have fun clean safe consensual sex. I really recommend it and I hope you love it as much as I do!
(Too find it in the App Store search “sex positive Oregon”)

"

I’m an OBGYN and I practice at a jail, where I take care of incarcerated women.

People often ask me, how did you come to work with incarcerated women? I was in the middle of my first year residency, delivering a baby. Everything was very familiar about the delivery scene; the nervousness, wondering if everything was going to be okay, helping the woman to push. But the one thing that was different is that she was shackled to the bed; she was a prisoner. And that moment troubled me so deeply that I developed an interest in learning more about these women.

Women make up a much smaller proportion of the correctional population than men — about 9% of everyone who is incarcerated. And 62% of [those] women are mothers to children who are less than 18 years old. Because women comprise such a small proportion, their gender-specific needs have been neglected. That’s particularly salient when it comes to their healthcare.

In theory, women do have the choice to have an abortion if they learn they are pregnant when they are in prison. There are constitutional guarantees — the 8th and the 14th amendments — and a number of judicial precedents, so it’s very clear that incarcerated women should have access to abortion. However, in practice, the people who are making the decisions have incredible discretion and many women lack access to abortion if they choose it.

About 1400-2000 births occur every year to women who are behind bars, and what they get for prenatal care is highly variable. There are standards that require prisons to have prenatal care onsite, but on the ground, some women have to be transported offsite and some women don’t even get prenatal care.

In labor, they usually get transported to an outside hospital. They can’t have any family support members in the room, and only 15 states have laws restricting the shackling of women in labor and delivery. A woman in labor, shackled, is what inspired me to work with this population. It’s inhumane and unnecessary, and it poses a lot of medical risks to the mother and the fetus. It also interferes with our ability to do emergent interventions if necessary.

People think prisons and jails are far away and we forget about the people who get locked up inside; we think they have nothing to do with us. So I hope I’ve given you some things to consider about what it’s like to be a woman when you’re in the grip of the prison or jail system.

"

From Dr. Carolyn Sufrin’s talk on incarcerated women and reproductive healthcare. Filmed at TEDxInnerSunset. 

Watch the full talk here »

(via tedx)

thebasehrbi:

Is Plan B like an abortion?

No, Plan B is a contraception pill, meaning that it prevents rather than terminates a pregnancy. It is a birth control that you can use up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex, however, it is more effective the sooner you take it. If you are already pregnant, Plan B will not work.

Want more information? Check out what Planned Parenthood has to say.

-Martha at The BASE

"While anatomy is important, sexual response is more than the sum of our nether regions."
— Kayt Sukel, from “The female orgasm as you know it does not exist" via The Sydney Morning Herald
(via bedsider)

thecsph:

thebasehrbi:

A lot of people like to explain consent in sexual encounters as “No means no.” This is true, but doesn’t capture as many crucial parts of happy fun sex and experiences as “Yes means yes!” Consent should always be informed and enthusiastic, never coerced, and you and your partner should be looking for consent continuously. Stay safe, stay happy, and have fun!

Consent can look different for different people, but that’s why communication between partners is so important. No matter what it looks like though, consent should not hinge on any fear, discomfort, or pressure. 

bitch-media:

Laverne Cox and bell hooks had a conversation and of course it was amazing. 

Read about the discussion and watch the whole thing on video at BitchMedia.org